3 Foods that May Trigger PMS - Young Naturopathic Center for Wellness

3 Foods that May Trigger PMS

What does PMS stand for? Ask around, and you may run into a number of tongue-in-cheek definitions. For example:

  • Pass My Shotgun
  • Pimples May Surface
  • Pardon My Sobbing
  • Puffy Mid-Section
  • Psychotic Mood Shift

Unfortunately, these are all pretty descriptive of what it feels like to suffer from pre-menstrual syndrome, the real meaning of this acronym.

For many women, though, PMS is no joking matter.

Hormonal changes during the few days before her period can cause a woman to experience a number of uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Bloating
  • Cramping
  • Mood swings
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Body aches
  • Food cravings
  • Fatigue
  • Tender breasts
  • Headache
  • Digestive upset

Most women experience some degree of PMS, and for some, the condition makes life pretty uncomfortable for several days a month.

No woman should have to endure severe PMS month after month.

If you are suffering from PMS, there are plenty of treatment options we can look at. One excellent place to start is with a few simple dietary changes. Here are some excellent ones to start with:

  1. Cut out sugar. Eating sugar triggers spikes in blood sugar which signal your body to produce more insulin. Excess insulin creates problems with estrogen regulation. Throwing your hormonal balance off in this way can definitely cause or intensify symptoms of PMS. So save those sweet treats until after your period.
  2. Reduce salt intake. Salt causes your body to retain water, which increases bloating. Bloating is no fun to begin with, and to add insult to injury, it can contribute to body aches. Salt is also very dehydrating. Hydration is super important to keep all systems of your body working well—which really helps to weather those monthly hormonal changes without going crazy. It may take some willpower, but cutting out those chips is the way to go.
  3. Reduce caffeine intake. Not to be a killjoy all around, but caffeine messes with the neurotransmitters in the brain and can disrupt the balance of hormones that affect your menstrual cycle. Without going into detail, suffice it to say it can worsen the effect of PMS. So take it easy on the java, OK? For some of us, that may require a quick reality check: a 24-32 oz coffee “cup” contains, in reality, 3-4 cups. I recommend drinking no more than 1-2 cups a day max going into your premenstrual time.

Can’t-do without your morning Joe? Watch my video above for an easy, PMS-friendly  “cheat.”

So if all the foods you like are on the no-no list, what can you eat?

Loading up on colorful fresh fruits and veggies is a great place to start. Lean proteins, whole grains, and legumes are excellent choices, too. And tracking your food on an app can make it easier to make healthy choices.

It may seem hard to change your diet at first, especially at that time of month when cravings kick in. But it gets easier with time—especially when you discover how much better you feel when you feed yourself right for PMS!

Need PMS help?

If you find these simple changes aren’t enough to keep your PMS under control, it’s a good idea to get checked out. Sometimes PMS can indicate underlying imbalances that need to be addressed. If you are struggling with symptoms of PMS, call our Patient Care Concierge. She’ll connect you with one of our doctors who can help. Because you deserve to feel good every day of the month!

 

What does PMS stand for? Ask around, and you may run into a number of tongue-in-cheek definitions. For example:

  • Pass My Shotgun
  • Pimples May Surface
  • Pardon My Sobbing
  • Puffy Mid-Section
  • Psychotic Mood Shift

Unfortunately, these are all pretty descriptive of what it feels like to suffer from pre-menstrual syndrome, the real meaning of this acronym.

For many women, though, PMS is no joking matter.

Hormonal changes during the few days before her period can cause a woman to experience a number of uncomfortable symptoms, including:

  • Bloating
  • Cramping
  • Mood swings
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Body aches
  • Food cravings
  • Fatigue
  • Tender breasts
  • Headache
  • Digestive upset

Most women experience some degree of PMS, and for some, the condition makes life pretty uncomfortable for several days a month.

No woman should have to endure severe PMS month after month.

If you are suffering from PMS, there are plenty of treatment options we can look at. One excellent place to start is with a few simple dietary changes. Here are some excellent ones to start with:

  1. Cut out sugar. Eating sugar triggers spikes in blood sugar which signal your body to produce more insulin. Excess insulin creates problems with estrogen regulation. Throwing your hormonal balance off in this way can definitely cause or intensify symptoms of PMS. So save those sweet treats until after your period.
  2. Reduce salt intake. Salt causes your body to retain water, which increases bloating. Bloating is no fun to begin with, and to add insult to injury, it can contribute to body aches. Salt is also very dehydrating. Hydration is super important to keep all systems of your body working well—which really helps to weather those monthly hormonal changes without going crazy. It may take some willpower, but cutting out those chips is the way to go.
  3. Reduce caffeine intake. Not to be a killjoy all around, but caffeine messes with the neurotransmitters in the brain and can disrupt the balance of hormones that affect your menstrual cycle. Without going into detail, suffice it to say it can worsen the effect of PMS. So take it easy on the java, OK? For some of us, that may require a quick reality check: a 24-32 oz coffee “cup” contains, in reality, 3-4 cups. I recommend drinking no more than 1-2 cups a day max going into your premenstrual time.

 

Can’t-do without your morning Joe? Watch my video above for an easy, PMS-friendly  “cheat.”

So if all the foods you like are on the no-no list, what can you eat?

Loading up on colorful fresh fruits and veggies is a great place to start. Lean proteins, whole grains, and legumes are excellent choices, too. And tracking your food on an app can make it easier to make healthy choices.

It may seem hard to change your diet at first, especially at that time of the month when cravings kick in. But it gets easier with time—especially when you discover how much better you feel when you feed yourself right for PMS!

Need PMS help?

If you find these simple changes aren’t enough to keep your PMS under control, it’s a good idea to get checked out. Sometimes PMS can indicate underlying imbalances that need to be addressed. If you are struggling with symptoms of PMS, call our Patient Care Concierge. She’ll connect you with one of our doctors who can help. Because you deserve to feel good every day of the month!

Categories: Women’s Health Issues

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